Getting Married in Mexico

Getting Married in Mexico


Getting married on a Mexican Beach or in a Mexican Hacienda is becoming a trend among foreign couples looking for a different and extra romantic wedding. Unfortunately, even while the foreign-wedding business is clearly growing, the Mexican authorities have not made enough efforts to facilitate the process. It is not...

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Mexico City’s Historical Center

Mexico City’s Historical Center


Centro Historico, the historical center of Mexico City is filled with impressive buildings ranging from Aztec times to the modern, amazing museums, remarkable murals and awe inspiring cathedrals. There is much to see and do in the old town area; here are some of the sites that are not to...

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Nopales

Nopales


A cactus salad, scrambled eggs with cactus, a cactus shake … probably doesn’t make most people’s mouths water with culinary anticipation, but nopales –the flat paddles of the Opuntia cactus– have a rich history in Mexican cuisine and are a fine addition to a healthy diet. Nopales are so revered...

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The Organized Chaos of Lucha Libre

The Organized Chaos of Lucha Libre


Sundays in the United States are impossible to disassociate with football. Not so in Mexico, where futbol americano enjoys regular television airtime, but it hasn’t reached the level of importance that the sport now enjoys north of the border (slightly less important than breathing, but far more important than governing...

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Creating a Modern Showcase in Casa Que Ve al Mar

Creating a Modern Showcase in Casa Que Ve al Mar

Profile: Architect Luis Treviño Perez Gil


Architectural & Interior Design: Luis Alberto Treviño Perez Gil, Photos: Marc Pouliot Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo based Architect Luis Treviño Perez Gil gained international visibility when he recently designed and built a Zihuatanejo apartment for Robert Marshall, an Urban Planner with one of the largest international architectural, urban design and interior design firms...

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Pacific Coast Pirates


…a 27 year old English Captain by the name of Thomas Cavendish, was bearing down on him with distinctly unfriendly intentions.”   An account of the Manila Galleon and English pirates off the coast of Mexico The Spanish galleon Santa Ana slowly tracked the coast of Baja California in November 1587 under clear skies and favorable sailing conditions. She was four months out of Manila and only days away from dropping anchor at her home port of Acapulco. She carried in her hold an immense fortune in Oriental treasure: gold, pearls, silks from the China, ginger, cloves and cinnamon from the Spice Islands, jewels from Burma, Indian ivory. Lookouts from the Santa Ana spotted distant sails as the overloaded ship passed by Cabo San Lucas. Captain Tomas de Alzola reduced sail and ordered camouflage netting to be hung. Weapons were issued to those among the 160 passengers and crew capable...

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Latest ADIP Articles
ZEE and Chinese Investment in Mexico

ZEE and Chinese Investment in Mexico

The states of Michoacan and Guerrero have recently established several municipalities along their seacoasts as a Special  Economic Zone (Zona Economica Especial, also known as  ZEE).     This action is expected to increase commerce and detonate the economy of the areas. Chinese officials visited the states of Michoacan and Guerrero earlier this month to review and...

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Real Estate News - July 2016

Real Estate News – July 2016

Welcome to the Second Quarter, 2016 Newsletter. In this edition we look at Mexico’s economic relationship with the U.S.A. and we check out Canada’s new immigration law. In addition to the VISA regulation, covered in the article below, Canada is seeking an increase of Mexican students for scholarships and an increase in temporary agricultural workers....

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Uruapan, Michoacán – Pearl on the Rio Cupatitzio (Part 1)

Uruapan, Michoacán – Pearl on the Rio Cupatitzio (Part 1)

Uruapan, Michoacán was founded in 1547 by Fry Juan de San Miguel. The sixteenth century city results from the amalgamation of nine barrios. Today, there are six, since San Lorenzo dropped out many years ago. The barrios are; La Trinidad, San Francisco, San Juan Evangelista, San Pedro, Santa Maria Magdalena and San Miguel. Each barrio...

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Do I have to pay taxes on my Mexico rental in the US?

Do I have to pay taxes on my Mexico rental in the US?

  Do I need to pay income taxes on my Mexico rental property if I only rent it a few times a year? YES!   Mexican newspapers are full of headlines about the growing problem of foreigners who are renting their homes or condominiums and failing to pay Mexican taxes.  Not only is this a...

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Printmaking in Mexico, a revolution in the arts

Printmaking in Mexico, a revolution in the arts

Artemio Rodriguez, (Mexican 1972–), La piñata que no se cae, 2010. Linocut 13×18. Artist Profile: Artemio Rodriguez Mexico has the longest and richest print tradition in the Americas.  From woodcuts to engravings to lithographs and linocuts, Mexico has enjoyed a long history of prominent print makers.  The first book published in the Western Hemisphere was...

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David Alfaro Siqueiros

David Alfaro Siqueiros

Courtsey of MOLAA (Museum of Latin American Art)


Artist and political activist, David Alfaro Siqueiros (1896 -1974), was a vital member of the Mexican School of Painting along with Diego Rivera and José Clemente Orozco. He continues to be viewed as one of the most important Mexican artists of the twentieth century while his artistic influence spread far beyond Mexico’s borders. Siqueiros was...

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Diego Rivera

Diego Rivera

Faithful…to his art and politics


It is with delicious irony that Diego Rivera was born in Guanajuato. In the indigenous Tarascon dialect, the name Guanajuato means: place of frogs. Often endearingly and sometimes not, Rivera, with rounded chin and eyes bulging with imagination acquired the nickname ‘Frog’. Rivera’s claims to history include his tumultuous two marriages with Frida Kahlo and...

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José Clemente Orozco

José Clemente Orozco

"Art is knowledge at the service of emotion."


Unappreciated in his native land for much of his life, José Clemente Orozco was eventually hailed as “the greatest painter Mexico has produced” during the years preceding his death by none other than arch-rival Diego Rivera. Orozco (1883-1949) dreamed of being an artist since early childhood, but tragedy struck before he was a teenager. First...

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Ask an Expert - Do foreigners have to pay taxes in Mexico?

Ask an Expert – Do foreigners have to pay taxes in Mexico?

If I do not earn any income in Mexico, nor have any investments in Mexico, as a permanent resident do I need to file a Mexican income tax return? Question 1: I sold my principal residence (not a rental) in PV in June and paid Capital Gains tax. I know I have to go to SAT...

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Global Mexico Comes to Banderas Bay

INSTITUTO IMOBILIARIO GLOBAL MEXICO A.C. (IIGM) was officially founded in 2014, in Mexico, by four real estate professionals, with more than 120 years in the Global real estate arena. The group has always believed that PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION for real estate agents in Mexico should be the foundation for anyone wanting to work or invest in...

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Semana Santa in Uruapan

Semana Santa in Uruapan

  For 55 years the artisans of Michoacán have come to Uruapan for the largest event of its kind in Mexico.  This year more than 300 came from forty-seven pueblos. Michoacán handcrafts and folk art is a Mexican regional tradition centered in the state of Michoacán, in central/western Mexico. Its origins traced back to the...

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The Fideicomiso will continue, amendment rejected

The Fideicomiso will continue. Amendment to Article 27 of the Mexican Constitution has been Rejected In May of 2013, the Mexican Chamber of Deputies (the lower house) approved legislation which would have amended the Mexican Constitution to permit foreigners to purchase property outright in Mexico’s Restricted Zone which is 100 kilometers from the borders of...

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Chiles: The definitive spice of Mexico

Chiles: The definitive spice of Mexico

  One of the most frequent flavorings in cuisines as diverse as Indian, Chinese, Moroccan, Hungarian and Mexican is the chile or chili. Some believe that it is perhaps the most commonly used spice in the world. The chile pepper is native to Central and South America. Research into its origins suggests that chile peppers...

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Manufacturing in Mexico, the new China

Manufacturing in Mexico, the new China

Wage increases, the cost of manufacturing, higher costs of oil that lead to higher shipping costs, lack of intellectual property rights protection, midnight conference calls because of the time difference and 16-hour flights for business meetings,  are all contributing factors in why many businesses are moving their manufacturing centers from China to Mexico. Automobile Industry, Top...

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Aeromexico gets a Dreamliner!

Aeromexico gets a Dreamliner!


Photos courtesy of Boeing, Aeromexico and airplanephotos.net This week Aeromexico took delivery of their 1st Boeing 787 Dreamliner, amid fanfare and celebration.   Boeing´s much anticipated, technologically advanced new 787 aircraft has been rolling out commercially since 2011 and despite a few glitches and literal bumps, it represents the most successful launch in commercial aviation...

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Mexico´s president proposes Energy Reform amid debate about privatization of Mexico´s petroleum industry

Mexico´s president proposes Energy Reform amid debate about privatization of Mexico´s petroleum industry

Energy reform and the privatization of Mexico´s oil and gas industry is a controversial issue in Mexico and  has been in the national debate for many years.  The main point of contention being whether Mexico needs to open up the state run monopolies of energy to private investment to allow much needed funding for upgrades,...

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Mexican Cuisine: Over Five Centuries in the Making

Mexican Cuisine: Over Five Centuries in the Making

Mexican cuisine is one of the best known and loved the world over, and for a reason, its flavors, sometimes robust and varied and sometimes mild and subtle, always have a haunting, mysterious quality that hints at the range of spices, herbs and condiments that it uses. Mexican food can be delightfully different from the...

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The colorful currency of Mexico honors history

The colorful currency of Mexico honors history

revolution, religion, arts and sciences


Mexican Bills come in six denominations: 20, 50, 100, 200, 500 and the newly unveiled 1000 peso note. The 20 peso note (re-issued in 2001 in a plastic form) shows dapper Benito Juarez. Born in March 1806 in a village in the state of Oaxaca from a poor, illiterate peasant family. Juarez didn’t know how...

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J.C. Superstar ! Julio Cesar Chavez: Boxing legend

J.C. Superstar ! Julio Cesar Chavez: Boxing legend

If you mention the words “J.C. Superstar” to an American, the chances are they will think you are talking about a Broadway play. Utter those five syllables south of the Rio Grande, and get ready for an onslaught of words about Mexico’s most beloved practitioner of the sweet science. Julio Cesar Chavez is emblematic not...

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Great Renovations: Let there be Light

Great Renovations: Let there be Light

An Ixtapa couple create the dream home they couldn't find


Renovation and Interior Design: Maru Pinto de Caraza Searching for your dream home and still haven’t found what you‘re looking for? One couple who were not ready to take on the task of building a home decided to make-do with what they had found, and make it their own. Renovating a dark, uninviting space into...

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The Bookstores of Donceles Street, Mexico City

The Bookstores of Donceles Street, Mexico City

Step into any one of the dozen or so bookstores on Donceles Street in Mexico City´s historic center and you might find yourself in a predicament similar to the following: Do you stick to the game plan, zeroing in on that novel about the Mexican Revolution that you haven’t been able to find anywhere else,...

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The Mexican Wine Oasis

The Mexican Wine Oasis

Parras de la Fuente


It is not a mirage! After having crossed a long desert there appears a miraculous oasis… In this valley of fertile land crystalline springs abound.  The Parras valley is a verdant space in which one forgets that they are surrounded by the semi-desert region of Coahuila. In addition to its water reserve, the Parras valley’s...

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The Versatility of 40 Pound Test Line

The Versatility of 40 Pound Test Line

If you had to make a choice for a single line weight to use in salt water fishing, what weight line comes to mind first? Remember, it doesn’t matter if it is braid line or mono-filament. The dedicated light line sportsman would probably choose twenty pound test, and have many a valid argument. Using a...

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Dulce

Dulce

Desserts in the Latin American Tradition


Excerpts from the book , by Joseluis Flores, with Laura Zimmerman Maye: Cajeta Cajeta is a goat’s milk caramel similar to dulce de leche (cow’s milk-caramel originally from Argentina) or manjar blanco (what they call dulce de leche in Peru). In Mexico, it is traditionally sold in small, thin wooden boxes, or cajas, on the...

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Olmecs of Mexico

Olmecs of Mexico

The Olmecs, which means “people of rubber” in Nahuatl (the language of the Aztecs) began their civilization in southeastern Mexico between 1600 B.C. and 1400 B.C. It wasn’t until this century that the Olmecs were acknowledged to be part of Mexico’s history. Researchers prior to this time attributed many of the discoveries now associated with...

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Guillermo del Toro, master of fantasy and allegory

Guillermo del Toro, master of fantasy and allegory

Guillermo del Toro's “Pan’s Labrynth” held its Mexican premiere at the 2006 Morelia International Film Festival.


I consider myself to be pure, but not innocent. – Guillermo del Toro  October 17, 2006 (Morelia International Film Festival 2006) Guillermo del Toro is one of the most unusually gifted and versatile directors to have emerged in recent years fromMexico. Master of the horror and fantasy genre in the country, since his international debut...

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Fredrick Catherwood’s Lasting Legacy

Fredrick Catherwood’s Lasting Legacy

In  the early 1840’s, two haggard men on mules emerged from Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula telling stories of a lost civilization discovered and unknown cities explored, long before the days when Nikon cameras and National Geographic magazine told us of these things. Between the years of 1839-1842, American John Lloyd Stephens and Englishman Frederick Catherwood, spent...

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The Mexican Wine Oasis

The Mexican Wine Oasis

It is not a mirage! After having crossed a long desert there appears a miraculous oasis… In this valley of fertile land crystalline springs abound. The Parras valley is a verdant space in which one forgets that they are surrounded by the semi-desert region of Coahuila. In addition to its water reserve, the Parras valley’s...

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Magic Carpets, Oaxaca’s Master Weaver Preserves a Zapotec Tradition

Magic Carpets, Oaxaca’s Master Weaver Preserves a Zapotec Tradition

When you enter The-Bug-in-the-Rug store in Teotitlán del Valle, Oaxaca, you are greeted by the master weaver himself, Isaac Vasquez, a friendly, soft-spoken man with salt and pepper hair. He invites you into his workshop, housed in the sunny courtyard of his family compound. Your eyes are immediately drawn to the carpets on the adobe...

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Kayaking San Carlos in Sonora, Mexico

Kayaking San Carlos in Sonora, Mexico

Choice of Bays, Open Ocean, Perfect for Beginners or Skilled Kayakers


Sitting on the Sea of Cortez, San Carlos offers tourists abundant reasons to visit. Multiple bays, coves and open water provide excellent kayaking for all skill levels. Just twelve miles northwest of the deep- water port of Guaymas, San Carlos is a year-round destination for tourists seeking sunshine and sparkling ocean. Available water sports include...

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¡Viva Mexico! ¡Viva La Revolucion!

¡Viva Mexico! ¡Viva La Revolucion!

Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Mexican Revolution


Mexico’s history is laden with severe social and economic challenges. In the beginning of the twentieth century under the rule of Porifirio Diaz (1867-1911), political corruption and the ever widening gap between rich and poor caused the country to erupt in a bloody revolution that lasted from 1910 until 1920. Once the Constitution of 1917...

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50 things I love about Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo

50 things I love about Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo

In honor of 50 consecutive, dogged and determined attempts to capture, encapsulate, commemorate this unique and delightful place we call paradise…We celebrated the 50th edition of ADIP with a list of our 50 Favorite Things about Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo. If you have 50 favorite things about Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo, send them to me at info@adip.info, subject line “50 favorite...

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Mexico Resort Real Estate Update

Mexico Resort Real Estate Update

From The Settlement Company®   Welcome to our Second Quarter, 2015 Newsletter. In this edition, we bring you a Los Cabos market report courtesy of Martin Posch of Windemere realty, a report from the National Association of Realtors® and economic news from Mexico   President Peña Nieto wraps up state visit as relations thaw Mexico...

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